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Discussion of diving methods and equipment available prior to the development of BCDs beyond the horse collar. This forum is dedicated to the pre-1970 diving.
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Vancetp
Master Diver
Posts: 377
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2016 7:26 pm
First Name: Phillip
Location: Belmont CA

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 & 2019

Mon Nov 29, 2021 2:53 pm

Before I forget again, thanks for the invitation to try out the Diluter. You can be sure that if I'm traveling to Texas, I will stop by to see you!

Yes, I was referring to the other end. My idea is to make a repair that uses a different diaphragm interface, and to make a diaphragm with a taller dome. I would definitely raise the whole arm from the base to keep the diaphragm from being stopped by the body castings.

The second diluter (the broken one) has an interesting difference from the one you have. The diaphragm is attached to a removable ring.

Image

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antique diver
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Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 12:50 pm
First Name: Bill
Location: North-Central Texas

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 & 2019

Mon Nov 29, 2021 5:11 pm

Vancetp wrote:
Mon Nov 29, 2021 2:53 pm
Before I forget again, thanks for the invitation to try out the Diluter. You can be sure that if I'm traveling to Texas, I will stop by to see you!

Yes, I was referring to the other end. My idea is to make a repair that uses a different diaphragm interface, and to make a diaphragm with a taller dome. I would definitely raise the whole arm from the base to keep the diaphragm from being stopped by the body castings.

The second diluter (the broken one) has an interesting difference from the one you have. The diaphragm is attached to a removable ring.

Image
You're welcome!

Ouch, I see that the demand arm actually broke, but even that is fixable. As you say, the diaphragm really does need to be taller, and that is what I'm working on today!

The second diluter diaphragm attachment looks interesting. Seems like that could be an improvement for easier access to the insides and reinstalling it instead of having to deal with stretching the diaph edges over the rim and having to tie it in place or use a good tight oring, and make it a wrestling match.

BTW, I ditched the large diameter diaphragm support plate, replacing it with a SS plate about 1.625" across... and it make a tremendous difference in ease of breathing since the diaphragm has more room to flex. Been fighting that for 3 years and it was such a simple fix!
The older I get the better I was.

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antique diver
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Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 12:50 pm
First Name: Bill
Location: North-Central Texas

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 & 2019

Tue Nov 30, 2021 3:17 pm

EVOLUTION of the TKR Diving Lung diaphragm... L to R,

1. Crumbling remains of the original Bendix from about 1942; (wet breathing) :?

2. July 2018 version in place on Bendix. Flowable Silicone spread onto sheer nylon mesh stretched over jig/mold. Used original back up plate. Soft and stretchy It worked well only with slow easy breaths up to 30' depth. Fairly successful, as we have survived numerous dives! :)
(Lately determined that it needs more height and a smaller interior support disc to allow more flex, stretch and demand lever travel... which led to the next versions)

3. 11/25/2021 version with new shape designed for more demand lever travel. Support disc reduced to 1.625" diameter. Same fabric sprayed with Plasti-Dip. Too stiff, no stretch... won't work. Maybe too many thin coats? Gave up on it. :(

4. 11/29/2021 version with same shape as #3. Constructed using same materials and method as #2. Back to using Flowable Silicone applied with finger tip. Jig/mold was modified to readily adjust for different heights, making it easy to make a variety of shapes in only a day each. Shown here still curing on the jig. Skirt will be trimmed to proper length upon curing. Hopeful that this will provide adequate air volume for heavier breathing when needed, since the demand valve will open much farther than with #2 version. Test bench experiments have been very promising. :D

Image
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The older I get the better I was.

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antique diver
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First Name: Bill
Location: North-Central Texas

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 & 2019

Tue Nov 30, 2021 9:43 pm

Diaphragm nearly finished. This final step seen here is shaping the skirt to fit into the groove on regulator body. The original 1942 diaphragm was held in place with thread wraps, but that seemed a bit tedious to remove and replace when fine tuning the reg. Vintage friend Swimjim suggested in 2018 that I try a tight fitting oring to retain diaphragm, and it has done its job nicely for 3 years of activity, so I'll just stick with it. Just like shown here. Thanks Jim! :D

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The older I get the better I was.

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Vancetp
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Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2016 7:26 pm
First Name: Phillip
Location: Belmont CA

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 & 2019

Wed Dec 29, 2021 8:56 pm

I went to school on Bill T about diaphragm making. I'm chagrined that it had me so apprehensive. Once you figure out a form, it's cake. Make a disk, stretch some panty hose material over the form, and paint on the flowable silicone with your finger. Two or maybe three coats and you've got a working diaphragm. Pretty easy. The silicone goes on nice and smooth.

Image

I've made 3 diaphragms so far: 2 for diluters, and 1 for a Trieste. For the Trieste, I made a Bill T type top mold, and to get the proper flang-ey type interface, I used the Trieste bottom box for the form on that side.

Image

That got me thinking about how to use a set of boxes as a mold for this kind of a diaphragm. All you really need is a support in the middle for the disk. I'd use pvc for that.

My next diaphragm project, hopefully using this technique, will be a Sportsways DH diaphragm for my DualAir. Fingers crossed!

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antique diver
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First Name: Bill
Location: North-Central Texas

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 & 2019

Wed Dec 29, 2021 9:26 pm

Nice job Phil! I'm looking forward to your completion of the Bendix lung, and hearing about your dive with it. Make it shallow and calm water.
The older I get the better I was.

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antique diver
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Posts: 2168
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 12:50 pm
First Name: Bill
Location: North-Central Texas

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 & 2022

Thu Mar 31, 2022 2:05 pm

The duckbill exhaling valve being exposed in my original configuration never created a problem, but it seemed so vulnerable to entanglement or damage that I wanted to try another approach. Here's an experiment with a modified duckbill eliminator (DBE), but I haven't dived with it this way yet. The mushroom exhaling valve is on the protected side near the back plate, and presumably safer there than the freely waving DB was. Hope to dive it in April and see how this works out.

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The older I get the better I was.

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antique diver
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Posts: 2168
Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 12:50 pm
First Name: Bill
Location: North-Central Texas

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 -2022

Mon Oct 03, 2022 12:28 pm

Since the beginning of this project I have had recurring issues with the hp poppet/seat occasionally deforming just enough to cause an air seep. It was never incapacitating but just irritating and a slight loss of air. Recently I discovered a source of information on the Bendix diluter that clearly stated that the maximum input source was designed for 450-500 psi! It was never intended to work with the 1800 psi source I was using, so it's no wonder I was having the occasional leak.

I found a simple little inline regulator that is not really vintage, but is old and certainly has a look that blends in with the other older brass components. Shown on the right side of the valve, below the brass tee in photo below. It was originally designed for about 80-100 psi discharge, but was able to shim the simple spring and piston mechanism to provide 240-250 psi to the Bendix. The combination seems to perform nicely at the test bench, and I hope to take it diving soon.

BTW, the fittings at the top of the tee allow me to attach a pressure gauge hose when desired.

Image
The older I get the better I was.

swimjim
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First Name: Jim
Location: Belgium WI

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 -2022

Mon Oct 03, 2022 6:26 pm

Pretty cool Bill. I'd like to swim close by you with a pony at the ready just in case. By the way, I brought my Aquamatic to Fortune Pond and it is still preforming quite well!

Swimjim

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antique diver
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Joined: Sun Dec 10, 2006 12:50 pm
First Name: Bill
Location: North-Central Texas

Re: "Build Your Own Diving Lung", Revisited in 2018 -2022

Tue Oct 04, 2022 12:37 am

swimjim wrote:
Mon Oct 03, 2022 6:26 pm
Pretty cool Bill. I'd like to swim close by you with a pony at the ready just in case. By the way, I brought my Aquamatic to Fortune Pond and it is still preforming quite well!

Swimjim
Hi Swimjim, I would feel much safer diving with the Bendix if you were nearby with a pony bottle!
I'm glad to hear that your Aquamatic is still doing well. I need to break mine out of a display cabinet and take it for a dive. I love that simple little reg.
The older I get the better I was.

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