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thepeanutking
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Re: Compressor Talk

Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:14 pm

Hey Guys & Gals I just ran across this thread & I have had a compressor for a while now and here lately I have revamped my rig with new cart it is mounted to for 2 storage bank tanks so it doesnt take me for ever to fill my regement of tanks, And Is a Ole 1962 I.H.-223 and still works realy well and I can still get parts fo it , So anyway I will post so Pic's soon as I get a chance.

Thanks
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captain
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Re: Compressor Talk

Tue Mar 16, 2010 10:12 pm

The Ingersol Rand 223 is a nice unit but not exactly portable. McWorter Engineering in Birmingham , ALA. put together scuba units using the 223 back in the 60's, 70's and 80's that were popular around here.
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tripplec
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Re: Compressor Talk

Mon Sep 22, 2014 3:38 am

I'm looking at getting a compressor that looks to be a conelius. with all this talk of synthetic oil do I need to be concerned with using an oxygen compatible oil running it at 2500psi to avoid risk of fumes exploding? I have access to food machine oil that our local fish plant uses in their refrigeration compressors but I would have to order anything special being I live in a small area.

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antique diver
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Re: Compressor Talk

Wed Sep 24, 2014 8:23 am

I do not recommend using oil designed for refrigeration units without a little prior research, since there are oils formulated specifically for hp air service that may be safer to use.

First find out the manufacturer's requirements for the oil viscosity.
Then obtain a good compressor oil that is formulated for high pressures and breathing air use. If a synthetic is available in the weight recommended it would be preferable. I do not recommend using oil designed for refrigeration units since there are oils formulated specifically for hp air service. Let me know what Cornelius recommends and I can have a better idea what to suggest for breathing air purposes.

Whatever oil you use you will still need proper filtration to remove all oil vapors and droplets from the final air discharge.
The older I get the better I was.

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Vintagediver
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Re: Compressor Talk

Wed Sep 24, 2014 10:34 am

Tripplec; first of all you've definitely come to the right place for some very helpful information in regards to your compressor questions. I've been involved with diving since the early 1960's but have never owned my own compressor until just this year; so being new to this myself I can definitely understand your concerns. To quote Tom Madere (Captain), and a number of others: "You will find that your purchase of a compressor is one of the best investments you will ever make in dive gear". Boy; were they right! I've had a slower than usual dive season this year; but in spite of that my compressor has already saved me over $150.00 in air fills this year! Earlier this year I bought a Cornelius 130R1500; which is 110 v and pumps 1.6 cf per minute, and I've been very pleased with it. Fortunately Brian has the Technical Manual for this compressor available on this website in the Manuals and Catalog section which I've printed out and it has been a very helpful reference. When I first got involved with this compressor I also had questions about which oil to use, and I had several of them recommended to me which were: Chemlube 201, Anderol 500 and Mobile Jet II. Based on the recommendations I received I am currently using Mobile Jet II; but as Bill (Antique diver) suggested be sure to find out what make and model your compressor is and then find out what oil is best to use. Also as Bill mentioned you will also need to obtain a filtration tower to add on to your compressor to remove any impurities such as oil vapors, CO and moisture condensation. Also be sure to see if your compressor is equipped a backpressure valve; if not you'll want to add one since these do a great job in helping remove moisture vapor to provide you with drier air. Another guy you can contact; who is one of the "GO TO GUYS" for compressors is Jim Shelden at Shelden Sporting Goods. He has a website; or you can call him at (316) 838-2844. Jim would be a good contact in regards to getting a filtration tower; that's where I got mine and he was a very big help. Good luck with your project, and keep us posted. Enjoy! 8) Terry Stevens
The friendship of many has been inspired and created while together we've explored beneath the waves the wonders of God's creation.

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captain
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Re: Compressor Talk

Thu Sep 25, 2014 9:40 am

The advantage of synthetic oils over others is the resistance to heat and the higher flash point. I have never heard of any oil specifically needed for normal oxygen concentrations. By normal I mean 20% to 36%, which is plain air to common nitrox percentages. Higher percentages and pure oxygen require an oilless compressor such as the Rix. Any synthetic oil that meets the viscosity requirement of the compressor should work. There is an old saying among mechanics, any oil is better than no oil.
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antique diver
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Re: Compressor Talk

Thu Sep 25, 2014 10:16 am

captain wrote:The advantage of synthetic oils over others is the resistance to heat and the higher flash point. I have never heard of any oil specifically needed for normal oxygen concentrations. By normal I mean 20% to 36%, which is plain air to common nitrox percentages. Higher percentages and pure oxygen require an oilless compressor such as the Rix. Any synthetic oil that meets the viscosity requirement of the compressor should work. There is an old saying among mechanics, any oil is better than no oil.
I agree with all but the "old saying.... any oil is better than no oil"...but I am sure that Captain is actually more particular than that with his compressor. Some oils may have too low a flash point for breathing air use and could be more likely to end up with combustion products in the breathing air in an overheating event.

We sometimes (rarely, but with good results) use Mobil One synthetic motor oil in order to meet some lighter viscosity requirements, and their multi-grade properties are helpful. The only synthetic compressor oils we stock are equivalent to 30 and 40 weight, and aren't multi-grade rated. I have used Mobil One (I think it was 20W50) in one of my compressors during the winter when the oil pump would not pick up cold 30 weight soon enough to suit me.

Jim Sheldon will know what works best in the Cornelius.
The older I get the better I was.

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tripplec
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Re: Compressor Talk

Tue Sep 30, 2014 1:29 am

"We sometimes (rarely, but with good results) use Mobil One synthetic motor oil in order to meet some lighter viscosity requirements, and their multi-grade properties are helpful. "


I used to work in a lawn mower repair shop. I used to work on Honda floor buffers that were prone to over heating. they were using Mobil1 synthetic. They didn't know it was over heating until the dipstick tube melted off and sprayed oil all over the floor. everything plastic in the crank case would melt but not a single score on the piston or sign of damage other than warped head.

I should of thought of that before ordering 17$/qt synthetic from North Shore Compressor. But it won't hurt that it's not food grade???? I know the charcoal filter is for that but I thought is was still supposed to be food grade for added safety.????

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antique diver
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Re: Compressor Talk

Tue Sep 30, 2014 8:04 am

"Food Grade" is not needed. For example, Bauer, one of the major breathing air manufacturers, does not recommend that. I recall at one time that they specifically advised against its use in their machines in about 2002 as not being adequate lubrication... but those oils may have been improved since then. They use Chemlube 500 and 800 synthetic oils, and advise use of that or equivalent synthetic lubricants. They also list some regular petroleum based compressor oils and motor oils as useable in their systems. BTW, Synthetic oils begin life as petroleum, and are refined to a different molecular structure that has better lubrication qualities. A high flash point is one of the important features to look for along with the lubrication efficiency. An overheating compressor head can actually cause some combustion of the oil vapors, resulting in toxic gases being added to your air supply, so the high flash point is extra protection.

You don't want to be breathing oil vapors of any kind, and it is the proper filtration and maintenance of same that makes the air safe to breathe. Keeping watch on the condition of the filter media is very important.

When the filter cartridge has gathered all the moisture it can hold in the molecular sieve matrix and charcoal materials it begins to release some of the other contaminants, such as oil, that it removed from the raw air!

Determination of the filter life of a given compressor is a whole other subject, and worthy of some discussion in another thread.
The older I get the better I was.

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